Taking Feedback

Sunday Beam #

36

September 19, 2021

Hey friends - Good Sunday 🌞!

Let's talk about taking feedback today because I've been running these live feedback calls for my new book. Love them! πŸŽ‰

If you've run some sort of businesses, you must have gotten complaints. When that angry customer complained to you, were you nervous? Did you wish you didn't have to handle it?

I spent 4 years running a kids coding school in my mid-20s and when a parent came forward, I was super scared! What was I supposed to say?

Until I handled enough parents and realized the ones who bothered to complain were actually the "VIP parents" because they gave us feedback so we could improve. Many other parents would just disappear and we would lose an opportunity to learn.

So now that I'm creating things online, I'd always proactively ask for feedback. If you've interacted with me, you might even feel that I ask too much feedback to a point I seem a bit insecure.

Well, in some ways, that's true. But I still like to do it - it is who I am πŸ’ͺ

I know that taking feedback is hard. You need to be vulnerable and put down your ego, so here's my attempt to convince you to be open about it.

  1. We need to admit we actually don't know that much. Each of us is just one brain having one life experience. If we want to create things that can sell to many people, we need their brains. So whenever you're creating a product, proactively get A TON of feedback!
  2. I realized a lot of people are bad at getting feedback. They simply ask "what advice do you have for me?" Nope, if you don't ask specific questions, it is impossible for others to help you. If you don't have specific questions, it is likely you haven't thought enough about it or you don't enjoy what you do (e.g. me being that quiet student in some college classes 😬)
  3. Always respect feedback. When people actually take time to give you feedback, no matter what you hear back, never get defensive. Just acknowledge and say thank you. Whether you take it or not, they don't really need to know on the spot.
  4. Question feedback. Honestly, not all feedback is good. I take maybe 50% of the feedback I hear back. This is because I know my own product the best with all the context, they don't. If you take 100% feedback, you don't know what you're doing. If you take 0%, you're full of yourself. Take feedback and then question yourself - does this make your product better for people?

And I love building in public because by sharing more, I get tons of feedback.

πŸ‘‰πŸ‘‰πŸ‘‰ Share what you think in this tweet discussion!

⭐ Inspirations for You

πŸ˜₯ When you get no followers and no engagement on Twitter - did you ask why? What went wrong? Daniel Vassallo's reply was gold and I couldn't help to jump in.

🎭 When you're desperate about some things, you tend to make all the wrong prioritizations and decisions. When you stop craving followers on Twitter, that's the day you start to get followers.

✍ Currently I Am ...

2 weeks ago, I started working on my new book/course called πŸ“—Showing Up Right. It is an actionable, no fluff guide for someone who is at ground zero and want to build up his/her online presence the right way.

As I am writing my 1st draft, I welcome you to become a beta reader to get early access & a chance to shape the book/course!

If you enjoy reading this newsletter, subscribe to get it directly.